The Healing Process

Newly Released

A new book by Rebecca A. Miles, Ph.D.

Grief is a universal human experience. Regardless of wealth, race, gender, or nationality, we all lose someone at some point in our lives. Healing from a significant loss is a process that takes place over time, even though some might try to “skip over” the suffering.

 

Rebecca A. Miles, PhD, tells the stories of everyday people going through the grieving process and discusses how they arrived to a state of healing and acceptance. Most of the stories are those of patients of her private practice and during her time as a clinical coordinator at a comprehensive cancer care center. 

 

Dr. Miles explores the normal grief process after losing someone—or sometimes as we anticipate losing someone—and how our relationship with that person dictates the sorrow we experience.

Chapter Two -
Julie and Judy

Two sisters couldn’t have been closer.  When one was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer, each worried more about the other than herself. A British period drama, a trip to England and a particular flower were all part of one sister’s healing journey through sorrow to healing.

Chapter Twelve –
The Purse

Very early one morning Louise got the call that her mother had suddenly died in a car accident. The entire family was shaken to its core, not only over the senselessness of the death, but because Louise’s mother had been the center of the family wheel. Dad was difficult. Louise began the long process of taking in the reality of a sudden death by staying connected to her siblings, routinely returning home to help her father manage the household, being physically active, and oddly, finding a moment of healing with her father when he opened his wife’s purse.

Chapter Seven –
Cancer Makes You Honest

Nicki was diagnosed with cancer in her early 20s.  She decided that if she wasn’t to have a normal life span, she wanted to live as honestly as possible, so she admitted that she was gay. Nicki had lived for years with the debilitating anxiety that her parents would disown her if she came out. Through the love of a supportive partner, some therapy, and an unexpected job offer, Nicki was finally able to break free from years of being held captive by anticipatory grief and move forward into living an authentic life.

Bio

Rebecca A. Miles, Ph.D., received her doctorate from the psychology department at Duquesne University and subsequently accepted an assistant professorship in that same department. She transitioned from academia to clinical practice after completing her hospital training in Behavioral Medicine in Oncology in the consortium of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. Dr. Miles held the position of clinical coordinator for the Behavioral

Medicine Department at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and also maintained a private practice focused on treating medically ill patients and the physicians and nurses who cared for them. She recently retired from her clinical practice and is now writing nonfiction full time. Dr. Miles continues her hobby of competitive swimming in the state and national Senior Olympic Games and currently is working on a book that focuses on American women Olympic swimmers in the post-Title IX era.

Tel: 412-745-7777 | lmcmahon@push7agency.com

Contact

For any media inquiries, please contact Lynn McMahon:

 
 
 
 
 

About the Book

This book explores the process of coming to terms with loss. In each chapter, the reader becomes a silent witness to therapy sessions in which a sister, a wife, a brother, or a physician struggles with the emotional ups and downs of the first several years of grief. You hear each person ask very human questions: "Is what I'm feeling normal?" or "Should I be over this by now?" The reader is encouraged to examine his or her own history of loss by using the technique of a Time Line of Loss. The book also introduces the Kaleidoscope Effect—a way of understanding the often unsettling changes in existing relationships after a death.

Each personal story testifies to the fact that grief is a state of being that affects our body, our psychology, and our social interactions. We can feel normal for weeks or months and then, as if by an undertow, be pulled back into sorrow and grief.

With empathy and insight, several stories explore the issue of losing a parent who was emotionally or physically abusive. How do we grieve someone whom we loved, but did not like? How do we remain compassionate in attitude toward a parent who was emotionally manipulative, yet now is old, frail, and dying? 

The message shared through each story is one of healing. Through the passage of time and with a little therapeutic intervention, these ordinary people were able to resolve their grief and reach out to reconnect with others in affection and love.

Chapter Highlights

Reader Comments

Chapter Two –
Julie and Judy

Two sisters couldn’t have been closer.  When one was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer, each worried more about the other than herself. A British period drama, a trip to England and a particular flower were all part of one sister’s healing journey through sorrow to healing.

“…It is comforting, in a 
way, to turn your 
attention to other real 
people with real loss and real heartache –and see clearly how 
something shifted for them, something that was a good catalyst in their healing process. The author is obviously a veteran in the battle with debilitating grief and has worked in a professional role to help many people over many decades. She did an excellent job of selecting a few stories to share which are relatable, interesting, and have a healing quality…” 

 

– Barbara H.

“…There is good, practical advice in here for understanding the grieving process and moving stories about how we can go beyond loss. Whether you are bereaved yourself or you work with people who are grappling with loss, this book will offer you powerful and useful insights.” 

 

– JA

“…In light of how daunting reading about grief can be, this book is an excellent resource, providing comfort and education…” 

 

– Denise M

© 2017 by Rebecca A. Miles, Ph.D.